Angie Jones

Angie Jones

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Angie Jones earned a degree in Electronic Arts from the Atlanta College of Art and Design in 1994 and a Master of Fine Arts in Painting from Laguna College of Art + Design in 2015. Since graduating from LCAD, Jones’ work has been the subject of her first solo exhibition at Prohibition Gallery Culver City (2014) and various group exhibitions nationally.

Jones’ work has been shown at galleries and museums including: Ball State University Atrium Gallery (2015), Laguna Art Museum (2012 & 2015), Q Art Salon (2015), Prohibition Gallery (2014), Flower Pepper Gallery (2014), Bedford Gallery (2010 & 2014), Beverly Hills Arts Show (2012 & 2013), Cella Gallery (2013), Fullerton Art Museum (2012), and The Chandler Center for Art in Arizona (2011), Rockford Art Museum (2011) and James Gray Gallery (2008).

Jones’ artwork has been published in LA Weekly (January 2015 issue); Apartment Therapy (November 2014), Platinum Cheese (August 2014: Studio Visit), Quiet Lunch (May 2014), Get Inspired (Summer 2014), Examiner (2013), and The Wall Street Journal (2010).My paintings begin not in the digital...and not in the physical, but in the mix our minds make of the two.

Statement:
I deconstruct the figure through abstraction. Using faceted surfaces (similar to low polygon video game art) I design something new, from something old and make it new again. My paintings present the influence of post-digital imagery on our collective brain circuitry. Much like the subliminal messages of advertising and commercialism, the aesthetic components of my work recognize the influence of technology on post-modern existence.

My vision is a splintered perspective of humanity while respecting the ...

Angie Jones earned a degree in Electronic Arts from the Atlanta College of Art and Design in 1994 and a Master of Fine Arts in Painting from Laguna College of Art + Design in 2015. Since graduating from LCAD, Jones’ work has been the subject of her first solo exhibition at Prohibition Gallery Culver City (2014) and various group exhibitions nationally.

Jones’ work has been shown at galleries and museums including: Ball State University Atrium Gallery (2015), Laguna Art Museum (2012 & 2015), Q Art Salon (2015), Prohibition Gallery (2014), Flower Pepper Gallery (2014), Bedford Gallery (2010 & 2014), Beverly Hills Arts Show (2012 & 2013), Cella Gallery (2013), Fullerton Art Museum (2012), and The Chandler Center for Art in Arizona (2011), Rockford Art Museum (2011) and James Gray Gallery (2008).

Jones’ artwork has been published in LA Weekly (January 2015 issue); Apartment Therapy (November 2014), Platinum Cheese (August 2014: Studio Visit), Quiet Lunch (May 2014), Get Inspired (Summer 2014), Examiner (2013), and The Wall Street Journal (2010).My paintings begin not in the digital...and not in the physical, but in the mix our minds make of the two.

Statement:
I deconstruct the figure through abstraction. Using faceted surfaces (similar to low polygon video game art) I design something new, from something old and make it new again. My paintings present the influence of post-digital imagery on our collective brain circuitry. Much like the subliminal messages of advertising and commercialism, the aesthetic components of my work recognize the influence of technology on post-modern existence.

My vision is a splintered perspective of humanity while respecting the original signature of human identity. As I explore identity and what makes each of us different, abstraction of the form creates a concentrated effort of gesture and simplicity similar to a text or emoji on your smartphone. My time working in Visual Effects, Video Games and Animation inspires the "peak shift" palette, faceted surface and idiosyncratic portrayal through paint.

In the end, my subjects are an analysis into the nature of shifting relationships with digital technologies and art forms. Maintaining one foot in the past and another in the future, I call into question how art is perceived by tracing a loop historically through image, technology and science. I paint my subjects as an existential complication and one that is ever changing and evolving.

You Are What You Eat
You Are What You Eat
  • 48 x 120 x 2 in
Pomp and Ceremony
Pomp and Ceremony
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  • 50 x 38 x 4 in
Meneer Van Gogh, 1889
Meneer Van Gogh, 1889
  • 30 x 30 x 1.5 in
Momento Mori Resurrection
Momento Mori Resurrection
  • 24 x 20 x 1.5 in
Luminous Opera Pink Skull
Luminous Opera Pink Skull
  • 7 x 4 x 9 in
Hermosa Triste
Hermosa Triste
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  • 24 x 20 x 1.5 in
After Life
After Life
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  • 48 x 36 x 1.5 in
Like A Boss
Like A Boss
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  • 3 x 3 x 2.5 in
Doom Sayer
Doom Sayer
  • 48 x 36 x 1.5 in
The Austrian
The Austrian
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  • 48 x 36 x 1.5 in
Don Don
Don Don
  • 48 x 36 x 1.5 in
Johnny V
Johnny V
  • 48 x 36 x 1.5 in
Kitty
Kitty
  • 48 x 36 x 1.5 in
Senora Kahlo
Senora Kahlo
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  • 48 x 36 x 1.5 in
Sienna
Sienna
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  • 48 x 36 x 1.5 in
Frida III
Frida III
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  • 24 x 20 x 1.5 in
Odysseus
Odysseus
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  • 36 x 36 x 1 in
Clothes Whore
Clothes Whore
  • 48 x 36 x 1.5 in
Kupka
Kupka
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  • 24 x 20 x 1.5 in
Frida I
Frida I
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  • 24 x 20 x 1.5 in
Cheeky
Cheeky
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  • 24 x 20 x 1.5 in
Year of the Tiger
Year of the Tiger
  • 66 x 54 x 3 in
Vanitas II
Vanitas II
  • 31.3 x 7.5 x 1 in
Margay Skull in Gold Leaf
Margay Skull in Gold Leaf
  • 6 x 6 x 6 in
Year of the Dog
Year of the Dog
  • 60 x 15 x 1.5 in